Fitness

Nine of the best fitness trackers

Nine of the best fitness trackers

The latest fitness trackers now come with powerful extras, including built-in GPS tracking for outdoor navigation or ECG capability to record heartbeats and rhythms, with some even sending results directly to your doctor. Here’s an overview of the latest innovations to boost your spring motivation.

Best Ultimate All-Round Multisport: Garmin Fenix ​​7

Garmin Fenix ​​7X Solar Sapphire, £779.99

The brand’s latest multisport device has many uses: from sleep and activity tracking (steps, floors and calories) to advanced settings for training and navigation, daily phone notifications, payments and Spotify. The new touchscreen makes it much easier to change data fields within an activity, and the larger 7X version of the watch has a new, very powerful built-in torch. Optional built-in solar charging enhances an already impressive 11-day battery life, and the watch can be used in water up to 100m deep. It’s also equipped with the best GPS accuracy available, as well as the brand’s fourth-generation heart rate sensor (with Pulse Ox, which records oxygen saturation levels). One of the most impressive wearables on the market. From £599.99, garmin.com


Best for runners: Coros Pace 2

Coros Pace 2, £179.99

Coros Pace 2, £179.99

One of the most comprehensive race-specific wearables for under £200 that has all the high-end hardware needed for a fitness regimen (from heart rate monitor to advanced GPS and power meter), without superfluous features that make them more expensive. At 29g it’s incredibly light, but it has an impressive 30 hour battery life in full GPS mode (which extends up to 20 days when used for heart rate, sleep and step tracking) . It also provides advanced race analytics, so the user has a wealth of data to dive into, and its clever algorithm means tracking work automatically aligns to the nearest 400m. £179.99, coros.com


Ideal for budding athletes: Whoop 4.0

Whoop 4.0, £30 per month

Whoop 4.0, £30 per month

This simple and comfortable wristband monitors heart rate, skin temperature, respiratory rate and blood oxygen levels. The technology is subscription-based (you sign up for a minimum term of six months and the strap is free). It comes to life through the app, where data is categorized into sleep, recovery, and fatigue. The metrics are especially useful for aspiring athletes who train multiple times per week, suggesting the optimal level of stress and recovery each day to optimize fitness gains based on historical data, which can be used to display longer-term trends when plotted over successive months. It’s a smart piece of kit that will work best when paired with other training devices like a running watch or bike computer. From £30 per month, whoop.com


Ideal for medically advanced sensors: Withings ScanWatch

Withings ScanWatch, from £249.95

Withings ScanWatch, from £249.95

It may look like a sleek Swiss watch, but it’s one of the most medically advanced wearables on the market. Its sensors (ECG, PPG and SpO2) are clinically approved, making it a top choice for patients with sleep apnea and atrial fibrillation as well as those with nocturnal breathing disorders. It’s also easily controlled via the Digital Crown – just turn and press to scroll the small PMOLED screen to view steps, phone notifications or start an ECG analysis. It’s got great battery life (forgoing a full-size, color digital display, so it lasts for 30 days), but since it lacks built-in GPS (the watch connects to a phone to track runs and other features ), it is not a good choice for the sports-oriented user. From £249.95, withings.com


Best for activity tracking: Fitbit Charge 5

Fitbit Charge 5, £169.99

Fitbit Charge 5, £169.99

Simplicity is the key to Fitbit’s newest and most advanced fitness tracker. The AMOLED display is bright and colorful with a well-designed default home screen, and features are easily activated via gestures on the touchscreen. The built-in GPS accurately tracks runs or walks without the need for a phone, and will also monitor distance in a pool if swimming is part of your regimen. Features like a heart rate monitor, blood oxygen, skin temperature and ECG provide a holistic view of wellness metrics from the well-designed Fitbit app – though personalized insights the most interesting are only available on the brand’s Premium subscription (£7.99 per month). ), which is free for the first six months. £169.99, Fitbit.com


Best for Triathletes: Wahoo Elemnt Rival GPS Smartwatch

Wahoo Elemnt Rival GPS Smartwatch, £299.99

Wahoo Elemnt Rival GPS Smartwatch, £299.99

Wahoo is best known for its GPS bike computers – it’s the brand’s first smartwatch. It is aimed directly at triathletes, but is also suitable for anyone focused on swimming, cycling or running. When it comes to stringing the three disciplines together, it has a contactless transition, meaning you won’t need to interact with the watch when competing. Plus, when you get on your bike, live stats collected by the watch are displayed on the bike computer – assuming it’s also a Wahoo. Some of the specs are slightly lacking compared to other recent releases. For example, the watch uses GPS and GLONASS (the Russian-based satellite navigation system) – while many others now target multiple systems to ensure faster locking and improved accuracy. That said, the scratch-resistant lens, generous 24-hour battery life in GPS mode, and easy-to-read color screen more than deliver. £299.99, wahoofitness.com


Best for training: Polar Ignite 2

Polar Ignite 2, £199.50

Polar Ignite 2, £199.50

A sleek watch that’s primarily aimed at tracking workouts, activity and sleep – but with accurate GPS, as well as one of the best heart rate sensors, it’s fully capable of wider use. fitness and running. The device tracks all-day activity and sleep, stress monitoring and relaxation exercises, so it’s pretty holistic, with easy navigation – there’s just one button that works in tandem with the touch screen. At 35g, it’s also lightweight, for added comfort. £199.50, polar.com


Best entry-level adventure watch: Suunto 5 Peak

Suunto 5 Peak, £259

Suunto 5 Peak, £259

It’s the multisport for anyone who wants reliable, high-performance sports tracking with navigation and adventure use, without the need for high-end features. It weighs just 39g and comes with interchangeable straps for customization. The backlit mode lacks a bit of brightness, but may be worth the trade-off considering the watch is quite affordable. It has up to 100 hours of battery life in full GPS mode and up to seven days in regular watch and tracking mode for steps and basic sleep analysis (via its built-in heart rate monitor). It’s great for navigation, too, with its easy-to-follow breadcrumb trail for mountain bikes, hikes, and runs. You can also create routes on third-party apps like Komoot, which sync with Suunto’s app and download to the watch. £259, suunto.com


Best for surfers and outdoor enthusiasts: Garmin Instinct 2 Solar Surf Edition

Garmin Instinct 2 Solar Surf Edition, from £359.99

Garmin Instinct 2 Solar Surf Edition, from £359.99

Affordable, funky (if you opt for Sunburst and Flame Red finishes) yet rugged, this watch is built to military standards for heat and shock resistance and is water resistant to 100 meters. It now comes in two sizes, has more features, and this special edition incorporates surfing features (kite and windsurf) with metrics such as tide times, waves surfed, and distance. Particularly great, the link with Surfline Sessions has cameras at over 600 beaches around the world, meaning that when surfing activity is activated on your watch, you’ll be able to see clips of the waves you’ve hit once. that you are out of the water. From £359.99, garmin.com